Tag Archives: alpaca

Welcome Alpaca Yarn Company!

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In our ongoing efforts to bring you high quality yarn from independent companies and dyers, we’d like to announce the addition of

Alpaca Yarn Company!

Alpaca Yarn Company is owned and operated by Beth Lutz.  She is a lifelong knitter with an eye for high quality yarns.  She owned an LYS before taking over the Alpaca Yarn Company.  As an alpaca owner, alpacas are her favorite fiber producing animal (a sentiment we at Alpaca Direct can totally get behind).

three_alpacas

Alpaca is lustrous and soft – rivaling cashmere in softness, but beating it out of the water on price.  It is also strong and one of the best fibers for temperature regulation.

Here in the shop we have two offerings from Alpaca Yarn CompanyClassic Alpaca Tweed and Halo Watercolors.

Classic Alpaca Tweed Woad

Classic Alpaca Tweed – This yarn is a luscious 85/15 alpaca/nylon blend.  It is a light worsted yarn with 110 yards per 50 gram hank.  It features natural colored flecks, giving it the distinctive donegal tweed look.  It is great for everything from sweaters to accessories.  Though, given alpaca’s tendency to grow, we recommend seamed sweaters over seamless ones.  (For more on that subject, check out our post about the two sweater construction options.)

Halo Watercolors Abstract

Halo Watercolors – This yarn comes in beautiful handpainted colorways.  It is a 78/22 blend of brushed Suri alpaca and nylon.  The brushed Suri alpaca is what gives this yarn its mohair-like halo, without the itch of mohair.  It is a laceweight yarn that comes in 50 gram hanks of 257 yards.  This yarn makes beautiful scarves, shawls, and cowls.

Come in to check out the new yarns in person, or throw a hand or two in your cart on the website and give these lovely yarns a try!

Independent’s Celebration – Malabrigo

It’s time for the next featured company for our Independent’s Celebration!

This week’s featured company is Malabrigo!

I first discovered Malabrigo several years ago, before Alpaca Direct opened here.  I was still pretty new to quality wools and luxury yarns at the time, having spent most of my knitting life getting cheap acrylic from big box stores.  By this time there was one local yarn store (LYS) in the area, and a new one was opening.  My mom (who is also a knitter) and I went to check it out.  Now, as I’m sure you know, when visiting an LYS you must go around and pet all the yarns that strike your fancy.

We came upon a stack of what would turn out to be Malabrigo Lace.  I instantly fell in love.  I think it was the softest yarn I had ever touched up to then, and it’s still in the top five.  The softness combined with the rich colors keep it in my list of favorite yarns.

My mom bought a hank and knitted me an Estonian lace scarf with it for Christmas.  I still wear that scarf all these years later.

Hats made from Malabrigo Twist and Malabrigo Merino Worsted.

Malabrigo is a family owned company based in Uruguay.  They started in a kitchen in 2005 with small batches of hand dyed yarns.  They slowly grew and now distribute their yarns worldwide.  They have added new yarn lines to their original Malabrigo Merino Worsted and Malabrigo Lace over the years, and long ago outgrew their first kitchen workshop.

They have maintained their commitment to producing one of a kind colorways and high quality hand dyed yarns.  Their commitment extends to using local (to them) wool producers, and all of their yarns are made with wool from Uruguayan farms who allow their sheep to range freely and care for them in humane ways.  For their yarns that use other fibers, they source their silk and alpaca from farms that show the same commitment to their animals and the environment as the Uruguayan sheep farms.

Their environmental commitment extends beyond their yarn sources to their manufacturing.  Their superwash process now meets Oeko-Tex standards, which means the yarns are free from harmful agents like formaldehyde, heavy metals, and other toxic chemicals.  Since I often recommend Malabrigo yarns for baby things, knowing this makes them an even better choice in my opinion.  They also use solar energy to heat the water used in their dyeing process.

 

At Alpaca Direct we carry Malabrigo Rios, Arroyo, Chunky, Finito, Lace, Worsted, Rasta, Silkpaca, Silky Merino, Sock, and Twist.

Malabrigo Rios Purpuras

Malabrigo Rios is a worsted weight superwash yarn.  It comes in 100 gram hanks of 210 yards.  It is a 4-ply yarn, making it great for sweaters, hats, scarves, and baby things.

Malabrigo Arroyo Indiecita

Malabrigo Arroyo is a sport weight superwash yarn.  It comes in 100 gram hanks of 335 yards.  Like Rios, it is a 4-ply yarn, so it is great for lighter weight garments and accessories.

Malabrigo Chunky Ravelry Red

Malabrigo Chunky is a bulky weight yarn.  It comes in 100 gram hanks of 104 yards.  The bulky weight makes it great for quick knits and warm, thick sweaters, scarves, and hats.

Malabrigo Finito Arco Iris

Malabrigo Finito is a fingering weight yarn.  It comes in 50 gram hanks of 200 yards, with five hanks per dye lot.  It is a plied yarn suitable for fine gauge garments and accessories.

Malabrigo Lace Baby Merino Whales Road

Malabrigo Lace is a lace weight yarn made from super soft baby Merino.  It comes in 50 gram hanks of 470 yards.  It is a single ply and makes beautiful lace scarves, stoles, and shawls.

Malabrigo Merino Worsted Polvoriento

Malabrigo Merino Worsted is a worsted weight yarn of super soft Merino.  It comes in 100 gram hanks of 205 yards.  It is a single, and is great for accessories that don’t see hard wear.

Malabrigo Rasta Baya Electrica

Malabrigo Rasta is a super bulky yarn.  It comes in 100 gram hanks of 90 yards.  It is a soft, slightly felted single ply, making it great for quick knits and accessories.

Malabrigo Silkpaca Archangel

Malabrigo Silkpaca is a lace weight yarn spun from a 70/30 alpaca/silk blend.  It comes in 50 gram hanks of 420 yards.  It makes beautiful lace shawls, scarves, and stoles.

Malabrigo Silky Merino Mares

Malabrigo Silky Merino is a DK weight yarn spun from a 50/50 silk/baby Merino blend.  It is a single ply that comes in 50 gram hanks of 150 yards.  It is great for lightweight but warm accessories.

Malabrigo Sock Ivy

Malabrigo Sock is a fingering weight yarn made from 100% superwash Merino.  It comes in 100 gram hanks of 440 yards.  It is great for socks as well as other lightweight garments, accessories, and baby things.

Malabrigo Twist Stonechat

Malabrigo Twist is an Aran weight yarn made from 100% Merino wool.  It comes in 100 gram hanks of 150 yards.  It is a plied yarn, making it great for sweaters, hats, and other accessories.

All Malabrigo yarns (except Silkpaca) feature the same super soft Merino wool for which Malabrigo is known.  All yarns come in the full spectrum of colorways offered by Malabrigo.  They are hand dyed in small batches of rich jewel tones and one of a kind colorways.

Malabrigo Nube Lavanda

In addition to the lines of Malabrigo yarns, we also carry Malabrigo Nube, Malabrigo’s line of spinning fiber.  Using the same super soft Merino as the yarns, these braids are hand dyed in the same colorways, too.  Hand spinners will enjoy the rich colors as well as the soft Merino wool while creating their own unique yarns.

All Malabrigo yarns are on sale July 24 – July 30.

 

Check back next week to see our next featured independent – Palouse Yarn Company!

 

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Log Cabin Fiber Arts Guild Spin In

Come and see us at the Spin In! We’re joining the Log Cabin Fiber Arts Guild as they celebrate 25 years of their Spin In event! Alpaca Direct will have booth featuring fiber, dye, spinning tools and more. Meet the staff and we’re bringing our wheels, spindles and knitting for a fun day in the fiber community! It’s a day full of demonstrations, raffles and fibery goodness. Bring your spinning , knitting, crochet, weaving or felting projects to enjoy with friends and be sure to check out the silent auctions and door prizes. No admission charge.

Log Cabin Fiber Event
Log Cabin Fiber Event
Kelley and our alpaca

Baby Alpacas Launched a Business and Built Family Ties

 American Express is sponsoring Small Business Saturday on the 30th so I thought it was only fitting to tell you the story about how our small business Alpaca Direct was started.  About 9 years ago my dear friend and neighbor on a nearby ranch stopped by to say hello and mentioned our neighbors down the road had Alpacas for sale. I asked her why she had not purchased one as she loved animals and rarely resisted the urge to bring home another animal to add to her “collection”.  She laughed and we scooped up my daughter Lauren and headed back down the road to see the alpacas.  The moment we saw the baby alpaca’s we were in love. Mercury

Our daughter Lauren immediately asked her dad if she could have one as she had been doing a great job raising rabbits for 4h and wanted to work with a larger animal.  We quickly learned that alpacas are herd animals so we had to buy 2 or more or they would become stressed and may even die if left alone.  We ended up buying two weanling males, Keeshon and Lightning.

 

 My friend Kelly bought Lightning’s dad Viking and placed him with a Llama she already owned. We found them easy to train and easy on our land as they do not mess with fencing or damage the ground.  They were also a great animal for our kids to work with weighing 115-130 pounds on average. Lauren was 11 years old at the time and could move them around without a problem.  Having the alpacas taught both our son and daughter how to be gentle in a kind of way that only animals can teach.  It taught them how to set boundaries but be fair and clear in their communication.  Looking back, I think that having the ranch with our 50 animals was well worth all of the work that was involved to make it run smoothly.

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 Once we started raising alpacas we learned how amazing alpaca fiber was and wanted to share this discovery with others.  I remember wearing an alpaca sweater when we were in a snowstorm in Bend Oregon and I was warm despite being stranded on the side of the road.

Alpaca is such a beautiful fiber with unique qualities however it is largely unavailable to the general public.  I wanted to share alpaca with everyone so they could experience the joy of warm feet in the winter or a soft, luxurious alpaca scarf around their neck.  That meant we had to find products made from alpaca that were high quality and reasonably priced. We went from having 2 alpaca’s to a herd of 15 and creating a store and website (www.AlpacaDirect.com) that now sells thousands of  products to over 80,000 customer around the world.  My son and husband work on the website and my daughter has helped with care of the animals, modeling and choosing what products to carry.

 We work hard everyday to bring alpaca and other quality products to our customers.  We have some of the  warmest alpaca socks on the market  and if you have cold feet then you will love alpaca.  Socks make a great gift so stop by the store and buy some alpaca socks for your loved ones this Christmas.  Give them the gift of warm feet and I have a feeling they will ask you for more socks in years to come.  Have a safe and blessed holiday season.  Have great family times and cherish those loved ones every chance you get!

 We hope you can stop by our store this Saturday to support our local small business. In case you have not heard about us, Alpaca Direct is a direct merchant of high quality yarn, socks, apparel and gifts. We carry a full line of fiber arts accessories, including hundreds of needles and thousands of yarns. Our unique selection of products also includes Peruvian alpaca sweaters, hand-loomed lace scarves, performance alpaca socks and cuddly alpaca teddy bears.

 

alpaca direct store customers
Happy Shopping at Alpaca Direct
outside of building
Our store and warehouse in Hayden, Idaho
Alpaca Bear
Cuddly Alpaca Bear

Our building is handicap accessible, with ample parking and is easy to find. We are located on Hayden Avenue, just two blocks west of Hwy 95 at 1016 W Hayden Ave. in Hayden.

Our store is open 11am – 6pm Monday through Friday, and 10am – 3pm Saturday. Visit us at 1016 W. Hayden Avenue or online at www.AlpacaDirect.com – your local destination for luxury yarn, apparel & gifts. “Like” us on Facebook and Yelp for exclusive coupons, product spotlights & news!

Fall Arrivals Have Begun

Our fall arrivals have begun to trickle in: new colors for lines we already carry, and some new yarns as well. This week we added our new Misti Alpaca yarns to the website. One of the perks of my job here is the opportunity to see and handle all the new yarns as we get them ready to go on the website. I’ve always been a fan of the Misti Alpaca Best of Nature line, but until now there hasn’t been a colorway I just had to have.

Enter the Best of Nature Worsted:

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This is #14 Shimmering Gunmetal.

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It’s a lovely mix of grey and teal green. Two of my favorite colors and so soft. Irresistible!

As usual, I don’t know exactly what to knit with it yet, but two skeins have joined my stash. For now, I’ll just pet them and enjoy the beautiful color.

I think I may also need some of the Misti Alpaca Hand Paint Lace #41 Dark Chocolate, but I’ll save that for another post.

Alpaca on the Green– a match made in heaven!

When you think of the greatest legends of golf, what do you see? Jack Nicklaus striding down the fairway? A black-and-white snapshot of a young Arnold Palmer teeing up? Whatever image springs to mind, we bet we know what they’re wearing: that classic, V-neck cardigan sweater. They came in bold, bright colors, with just 4 or 5 simple buttons down the front. We’re sure you remember the unassuming, gentlemanly style– but did you know those sweaters were made from alpaca?

Alpaca Golf Cardigan

 

The alpaca golf cardigan has been a staple of high-end golf apparel since the late 50’s, and for good reason. Each alpaca fiber is incredibly fine– only half the width of a human hair– yet has a hollow core to provide unparalleled insulation. That means an alpaca sweater can protect you against the harshest April breezes, without the bulk or itch of a traditional wool sweater. The look is refined & classic without a hint of fuss, and every golfer from the “Golden Bear” to Bing Crosby had one. In fact, Sports Illustrated reports that Frank Sinatra had the charming habit of selecting dozens of alpaca sweaters as gifts from the pro shop (in his own choice of garish colors, of course), with instructions that they were not to be accepted as returns!

 

 

 

 

Thankfully, alpaca golf sweaters are no longer exclusive to Rat Pack establishments & expensive pro shops. Since alpaca are native to South America, Alpaca Direct imports top-quality sweaters directly from Peru, so you pay a fraction of what Arnie did back in the 60s. Our classic golf cardigans & vests are equally well-suited for the third hole or the third course at the club, keeping you comfortable, warm & stylish. Plus, we’ve just begun our largest inventory clearance sale ever, with dozens of styles up to 50% off just in time for spring’s first tee time.

Dahlgren walking sock
The legends knew that golfing & alpaca was a match made in heaven– so why stop with sweaters? Keep your feet warm & dry on the fairway with our new Dahlgren Walking socks, engineered with golfers in mind! Each sock has wicking rings to keep moisture moving up & out of the shoe, preventing discomfort & blisters. The carefully selected blend of merino wool, nylon & alpaca provides optimal insulation, cushion & durability with each step. Available in a variety of colors in both men’s & women’s sizes, these socks are ideal for any walker or athlete looking for a true performance sock.

No one does alpaca like Alpaca Direct!

It’s tough to get knitters, spinners & crocheters to agree on anything– let’s face it, we’re an opinionated bunch of people! Fiber lovers of all stripes get into heated arguments at our Idaho storefront: whose craft is easiest for beginners, which stitch is best for a breathtaking scarf, whether metal or wooden tools are better & under what conditions… But underneath all the lighthearted (or occasionally not-so-lighthearted!) squabbling, there’s one thing that draws us all together once more: an appreciation for fiber of true quality & value. That’s why we at Alpaca Direct are so passionate about crafting with alpaca yarn & rovings!

It’s nearly impossible to convince someone how soft & elegant alpaca is until they feel it for themselves. We make a point of displaying an inviting, loosely-plied alpaca yarn right at the entrance to our booth whenever we attend expos & trade shows. Without fail, passers-by will casually brush against it, stop dead in their tracks, and hurry in to find more! It’s a fiber with an unbelievably soft hand, unparalleled insulation & a luxurious natural drape– and, best yet, it’s affordable when you buy direct!

Any weight…
Alpaca can be spun to almost any yarn weight, from drool-inducing chunkies down to lace yarns so fine that they double as embroidery wool!  

And any color… 

On any budget… 

  • Fantastic new Camino Alpaca from Plymouth is especially great for  men’s projects, and won’t break the bank at just $6.95 per ball! Camino Alpaca in Browns #101
  • Get a true steal on the last two colors of Misti’s dreamy Alpaca Sport yarn, on clearance for $5.99 a skein
  • Back by popular demand, Plymouth’s Baby Alpaca Brush is a truly unique option with an unassuming halo & a plushy softness reminiscent of angora. Select colors start at only $5.52 per ball
  • Or, treat yourself to the ultimate in hand-dyed luxury– snatch up one of our last hanks of Saratoga, a fabulous alpaca & cotton worsted yarn from Great Adirondack
  • Layer on the luxe with new Debbie Bliss Andes, a stunning blend of alpaca & mulberry silk

For every crafter! 

Ski with Warm Socks from Alpaca Direct

If you’re planning an outdoor adventure this winter, don’t forget to take care of your feet! Cold temperatures, dry air & stiff boots work together to wreak havoc on your heels & toes this time of year. Protect your feet from cold, discomfort & blistering with a pair of carefully constructed Dahlgren socks from Alpaca Direct! We stock 3 types of socks designed specifically for cold weather: the Sno sock, the Sno Comp sock, and the Expedition sock. 

Sno socks

 

 

 

For an all-purpose winter sock, the Dahlgren Sno sock can’t be beat. It is a well-balanced sock with padding & insulation right where you want them: under the foot & around the shin. They're available in 3 colors for women and 1 for men.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sno comp socks

 

 

 

Serious skiers have got to try the Sno Comp line for pro-level performance. All-over compression promotes blood flow to keep your feet warm without adding any bulk inside your ski boot– great for progressive stance! And that gorgeous pattern down the side of your calf? They're actually wicking "super highways" to channel moisture up & out of the boot. Plus, they look wicked cool. Two colors for men & six choices for ladies!

 

 

 

 

 

Expedition socks

 

 

 

On the other end of the thickness spectrum is the Expedition sock, our thickest & warmest Dahlgren sock. It’s an extra tough, extra tall boot sock with added alpaca for maximum insulation. It's your favorite blanket, foot-shaped! Check out the Men's Expedition socks & the Women's Expedition socks from Alpaca Direct.

 

 

 

 

 

 

All three of these socks have Dahlgren’s patented wicking technology, which channels moisture up the sock & away from your foot, keeping blisters at bay. Come feel the difference at Alpaca Direct, your online source for alpaca socks & more!
  

Project Tutorial: Owl Fingerless Gloves Pattern

These cute & studious little cabled owls will keep your hands toasty & the textbook pages turning!    We’ve included a step by step tutorial along with the pattern for these adorable owl fingerless gloves.

Materials:  Owl fingerless gloves while reading owl-reading-mitts-patternowl-reading-mitts-tutorial-1

Stitches & Abbreviations:

  • dpns— double-pointed needles
  • m1— make 1 new stitch by picking up the running thread from the back & knitting it
  • c4b— slip 2 stitches to cable needle & bring to back of your work, knit 2 regular stitches, then knit 2 stitches from cable needle
  • c4f— slip 2 stitches to cable needle & bring to front of your work, knit 2 regular stitches, then knit 2 stitches from cable needle
  • k2tog— knit 2 stitches together
  • [instructions]— brackets don’t need any special treatment; they are just to help keep instructions organized

Directions:

Left glove:

Cast on 20 stitches & divide evenly between 4 dpns, being careful not to twist the cast-on. Place marker & join.

  • Rounds 1-12: *k2, p2* repeat around (2 x 2 ribbing)
  • Round 13:  knit around
  • Round 14: *k4, m1* repeat around— 25 stitches in round
  • Round 15: knit around

Now, you’ll rearrange the stitches on your dpns to make the counting easier. From the marker, leave 2 stitches on the first dpn. Place the next 12 stitches on the second dpn. Place the next 9 stitches on the third dpn & leave the last 2 stitches on the fourth dpn. The brackets will help you see what happens on each dpn.

  • Round 16: [k1, m1, k1], [k2, p8, k2], [k9], [k1, m1, k1]— 27 stitches in round
  • Round 17: [k3], [p2, k8, p2], [k9], [k3]
  • Round 18: [k1, m1, k2], [p2, k8, p2], [k9], [k2, m1, k1]— 29 stitches in round
  • Round 19: [k4], [p2, c4b, c4f, p2], [k9], [k4]
  • Round 20: [k1, m1, k3], [p2, k8, p2], [k9], [k3, m1, k1]— 31 stitches in round
  • Rounds 21-24: [k5], [p2, k8, p2], [k9], [k5]
  • Round 25: [k5], [p2, c4b, c4f, p2], [k9], [k5]
  • Round 26: [k5], [p2, k8, p2], [k9], [k5]
  • Rounds 27 & 28: [k5,], [p2, k1, p2, k2, p2, k1, p2], [k9], [k5]
  • Round 29: [k5], [p2, k8, p2], [k9], [k5]
  • Round 30: [k5], [p2, c4b, c4f, p2], [k9], [k5]
  • Round 31: [k5], [p2, k8, p2], [k9], [k5]
  • Round 32: knit around
  • Round 33: [k5], [k12], [k9], but don’t work the last 5 stitches on the fourth dpn

Slip the first 5 stitches  of the round & the last 5 stitches of the round onto a piece of scrap yarn & set aside— these will become your glove’s thumb later (10 stitches total). Cast on 1 extra stitch across the gap to connect the remaining stitches in a round, and rearrange evenly on your dpns (22 stitches total).

  • Rounds 34 & 35: knit around
  • Round 36: purl around
  • Round 37: *k2tog, yo* repeat around
  • Round 38: purl around
  • Round 39: knit around

Loosely bind off the 22 stitches from your dpns.

Slip the thumb stitches back onto your dpns & distribute evenly (you may only want to use 3 dpns here). Pick up & knit 1 stitch in the gap where the thumb meets the body of the glove (11 stitches total).

Rounds 1-3: knit around

Loosely bind off all thumb stitches.

Right glove:

Cast on 20 stitches & divide evenly between 4 dpns, being careful not to twist the cast-on. Place marker & join.

  • Rounds 1-12: *k2, p2* repeat around (2 x 2 ribbing)
  • Round 13:  knit around
  • Round 14: *k4, m1* repeat around— 25 stitches in round
  • Round 15: knit around

Now, you’ll rearrange the stitches on your dpns to make the counting easier. From the marker, leave 2 stitches on the first dpn. Place the next 9 stitches on the second dpn. Place the next 12 stitches on the third dpn & leave the last 2 stitches on the fourth dpn. The brackets will help you see what happens on each dpn.

  • Round 16: [k1, m1, k1], [k9], [k2, p8, k2], [k1, m1, k1]— 27 stitches in round
  • Round 17: [k3], [k9], [p2, k8, p2], [k3]
  • Round 18: [k1, m1, k2], [k9], [p2, k8, p2], [k2, m1, k1]— 29 stitches in round
  • Round 19: [k4], [k9], [p2, c4b, c4f, p2], [k4]
  • Round 20: [k1, m1, k3], [k9], [p2, k8, p2], [k3, m1, k1]— 31 stitches in round
  • Rounds 21-24: [k5], [k9], [p2, k8, p2], [k5]
  • Round 25: [k5], [k9], [p2, c4b, c4f, p2], [k5]
  • Round 26: [k5], [k9], [p2, k8, p2], [k5]
  • Rounds 27 & 28: [k5,], [k9], [p2, k1, p2, k2, p2, k1, p2], [k5]
  • Round 29: [k5], [k9], [p2, k8, p2], [k5]
  • Round 30: [k5], [k9], [p2, c4b, c4f, p2], [k4]
  • Round 31: [k5], [k9], [p2, k8, p2], [k5]
  • Round 32: knit around
  • Round 33: [k5], [k9], [k12], but don’t work the last 5 stitches on the fourth dpn

Slip the first 5 stitches  of the round & the last 5 stitches of the round onto a piece of scrap yarn & set aside— these will become your glove’s thumb later (10 stitches total). Cast on 1 extra stitch across the gap to connect the remaining stitches in a round, and rearrange evenly on your dpns (22 stitches total).

  • Rounds 34 & 35: knit around
  • Round 36: purl around
  • Round 37: *k2tog, yo* repeat around
  • Round 38: purl around
  • Round 39: knit around

Loosely bind off the 22 stitches from your dpns.

Slip the thumb stitches back onto your dpns & distribute evenly (you may only want to use 3 dpns here). Pick up & knit 1 stitch in the gap where the thumb meets the body of the glove (11 stitches total).

Rounds 1-3: knit around

Loosely bind off all thumb stitches.

 

Diving in Deeper:

What is with all the brackets?

Yeah, I know… knitting patterns aren’t supposed to look like math textbooks, right? But bear with me here for a minute. If you haven’t started a pair of these gloves, this probably looks super threatening & you can’t imagine how such ugliness could ever be helpful. Here’s the dealio, though: when you reach that part of the pattern, you have your 25 stitches split very strategically across 4 double-pointed needles. The brackets help you see what is happening on each of the 4 needles— they’re just a way to visually break up the round into bite-size chunks!

“Split very strategically?” Want to elaborate a little there?

In my Holly Holiday voice: I thought you’d never ask! While the gunk inside the brackets looks like word soup at first glance, there really is a pattern from round to round. Take a look at the left glove, for example.

  • The first & last brackets correspond to the stitches on your first & last dpns. They start off with only 2 stitches each, but increase every other round until they hold 5 stitches each. Then, they sit tight & get knit until it’s time to turn those stitches into the thumb of your glove.
  • The second bracket is where your owl will take shape. The written-out directions are hard to visualize, but the chart below might help you see what’s really going on under all that purling & cabling.owl_chart_1

 

  • The third bracket is plain-Jane knit stitches, every single round! This chunk of stitches will become the palm of your glove.
  • Then, to make your right glove, it’s the same process, just with the 2nd & 3rd brackets switched!

Why the floopy yarn-overs at the end of the glove?

This is a purely stylistic choice that you are, of course, welcome to modify or leave out altogether. From round 37 onward, you’re creating some raised eyelets for the top edge of your gloves. They are there for two reasons: first, to combat the rolling tendency of plain old stockinette stitch, and second, to look classy as hell. Who wants ribbing at the top of fingerless gloves, right?

Finishing:

Weave in ends & trim. Sew buttons into place as the owls’ eyes— the little square of purled stitches marks where they belong. Now slip them on & never choose between cute & smart again!owl fingerless gloves

Ready to turn your screen off & start knitting?

Download Owl Reading Mitts tutorial for a printable version of this post, or

Download Owl Reading Mitts pattern for a no-nonsense printable pattern.

XOXOXOXO, Meg :)

These pretty little gloves were knitted with Cascade Yarns Chunky Baby Alpaca in Cafe Au Lait.

© 2011 Meghan Bosanko